MODERNERABASEBALL.COM, Home Of Joe Connor's Annually-Updated Electronic Ballpark Guides Since 2001!

Uganda Respondin'

Home Sweet Home
Buy Joe's Guides
About Joe's Guides
About/Contact Joe
About the Dedication
Father's Day Contest
Buyer Testimonials
'18 AZ Spring Training
'18 FLA Spring Training
Old Spring Training Sites
Year Spring Training Changed
Dual-Use Divas
Best NCAA Ballparks
MLB Ballpark Trips
Minor League Ballparks
Indy League Ballparks
College Summer Lgs.
AK: The Last Frontier
Best Baseball Museums
2018 Caribbean Series
European Feast
Sultans Of Swing
Under Construction

COWING EN ROUTE TO THE BALLFIELD IN UGANDA
ugandaintro.jpg
THEY MAY LACK SHOES AND SOCKS, BUT THESE UGANDAN BOYS SURE CAN PLAY

Baseball was introduced to Uganda in 1989 by American Tom Roy of Unlimited Potential Inc. in Warsaw, Indiana, an evangelistic Christian organization whose motto is "Serving Christ Through Baseball." Baseball started in three Uganda primary schools. And it started with less than a dozen balls, six bats and no gloves.

"Most of the kids were scared (to catch balls without a glove); only the brave ones stood their ground," recalled Barnabas Mwesiga, who has headed Uganda's baseball program. "I think our athletes here feel they are talented in an artistic way such as their natural talent and a bit of show."

 

You can learn more about baseball in Africa and Uganda in World in a Ballpark: Baseball Goes Global which is available for purchase at the Buy Joe's Guides page.

 

You can enjoy Joe's photos from other Africa destinations by traveling to these links: Sultans Of Swing: Baseball in Africa & The Middle East; South African Plain; and Jambo From Kenya!

 

If you want to view a sample of the guide and see how easy the guide is to use, visit the World Baseball Classic page.

SUNSET BALL ON A CRICKET FIELD ABOVE KAMPALA
ugandaaction.JPG
UGANDAN BOYS HAVE EXCELLENT HAND-EYE COORDINATION DESPITE A PREDOMINANTLY SOCCER HISTORY

Today, Uganda has 215 players under the age of 12 playing baseball, and 100 ages 12-14 playing. Many were only introduced to the game in the last five years, but the game has spread from the capitol city of Kampala to towns like Lugazi and Jinja, and even to Arra in the North.

MLB is curious. It sent five Ugandans to its first European academy. Only some 10 years after baseball was introduced, in 1999, Uganda qualified to play at the All-Africa Games in South Africa, the tournament that decided who would participate in the Africa-Oceania Olympic Qualifier for a chance to go to the Olympics. Uganda did not qualify to advance, but gained the most notice for its talented athletes.

Ugandans athletic history is not noteworthy, mired in as much disappointment as its political history. This East African country, which became independent of British rule in 1962, is known to most of the western world as one dangerous place, bordering other roughhouses like the Congo and Rwanda. The reason for its bad rap is multiple: the nearly decade long regime of mass murderer Idi Amin in the 1970s who killed some 300,000 opponents. Later, guerrilla war and human rights abuses under Milton Obote claimed at least another 100,000 lives.

Although today Uganda is one of Africa's fastest growing economies, it still has a terrible perception in most of the world. Despite the fact most of the country is safe, Northern Uganda remains dangerous, further damaging the country's reputation. The NBC television program, Dateline, exposed the ongoing battle between the Uganda government and the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), which occupies the north and seeks to overthrow the Ugandan government. With virtually no popular support, the LRA abducts nearly 30,000 children to fight for their cause and forces them to kill their own family members, or risk being killed themselves.

But despite the bad press, Uganda is on the up and up. During the 1990s, the economy turned in a solid performance. In the last several years, 15 universities have opened as Uganda's population is young. It's also growing. Within 10 years, the country's population is expected to hit 50 million.

Still, for a population of 27 million, only one Ugandan has ever medaled in the Olympics. Its soccer team, Africa's most popular sport, has only advanced to the finals of the Africa Cup of Nations once. On a smaller scale, could baseball do for Uganda what it's done in the Dominican Republic?

JOE STRIKES A POSE WITH HIS UGANDANS FRIENDS
ugandanfriends.jpg
THE UGANDANS BOAST THE MOST POTENTIAL FOR GROWTH ON THE AFRICAN CONTINENT

UGANDANS LISTEN TO JAPANESE COACHING
japanesecoaching.jpg
BOTH U.S. AND JAPANESE INFLUENCE IS PRESENT

The Japanese have invited and hosted players of African descent, which included inviting 10 boys under the age of 14 from Uganda in 2004. They were coached by former Orix Blue Wave (now Orix Buffaloes) Manager, Hironori Ishige. The Japanese have also sent coaches to Uganda. The Association for Friends of African Baseball, a Japanese non-profit group, paid for the Ugandans trip to Japan. Its goal is to "Create the world's peace through catch and throw."

NO SHOES, NO PROBLEM IN UGANDA
barefootboy.JPG
THIS YOUNG BOY WAS HITTING AWAY

Since 2001, Home of Joe Connor's Highly-Acclaimed Ballpark Guides! © Copyright 2017 ModernEraBaseball.com. All rights reserved